Some people believe that that the ancient Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans played different versions of tennis. Drawings and descriptions of any tennis­like games have not been discovered, but a few Arabic words dating from ancient Egyptian times are cited as evidence. The theory goes that the name tennis derives from the Egyptian town of Tinnis alongside the Nile and the word racquet evolved from the Arabic word for palm of the hand, rahat. In 1874, Major Walter C. Wingfield patented in London the equipment and rules for a game very similar to modern tennis. In the same year, the first tennis courts appeared in the United States. By the following year, equipment sets had been sold for use in Russia, India, Canada, and China. Croquet was highly popular at this time, and the smooth croquet courts proved readily adaptable for tennis. Wingfield’s original court had the shape of an hourglass, narrowest at the net, and it was shorter than the modern court. His rules were subjected to considerable criticism, and he revised them in 1875, but he soon left the further development of the game to others. In 1877, the All England Club held the first Wimbledon tournament, and its tournament committee came up with a rectangular court and a set of rules that are essentially the game we know today. The net was still five feet high at the sides, a carryover from the game’s indoor ancestor, and the service boxes were 26 feet deep, but by 1882, the specifications had evolved to their current form. Tennis competitions for women were introduced in 1884 in this championship. In India, tennis promotion and competitions are controlled by All India Lawn Tennis Association.